Needed in every Town?

In a Town like Rotherham there are numerous charities, local groups and clubs that invite on to their controlling boards, people who lend their reputations to these organisations, who then trade on this, as evidence of their bona fides.

Such people, in political parlance, are referred to as ‘useful idiots‘.

Rotherham’s ‘useful idiots’ would be advised to consider their positions with regard to whether they are being exploited in this way?

5 thoughts on “Needed in every Town?

  1. I think the word charity has become very abused since the previous Labour government. Charity to me was about giving without making monetary gain or seeking publicity from doing so. “I had 10 years involvement with DART, but could never understand why RMBC could use it to draw money down from the EU and then not allow the transparency of the money going through the accounts of DART, this was the year before I got involved with DART.” “I also can’t understand why an essential service like Bluebell wood hospice, isn’t run by the government, rather than a lottery such as a charity, one wonders if there was an hidden agenda by this being so. My ex partners son was one of the first to use and this was a reason why when I ran Dinnington business club I gave profits to the hospice.” I would be very reluctant to get involved with any trust or charity in future until I had seen the accounts and knew there was no hidden agenda.

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    • Tim,
      Way back when Henry the eighth dissolved the monasteries, he invented a thing called “charities” to take on the more useful work that they had been doing. That “useful work” was known as “charitable objectives”. It included: education, provision for the elderly and infirm… etc. [… off the top of my head I cant remember the rest ]
      Nothing much has changed since then;
      OK back in 2011 all of the earlier acts of parliament were consolidated into a 2011 Charities Act , but no changes were made.
      Bluebell Wood Hospice:
      Hospices are most commonly run as charities; but whilst hospices for the elderly receive on average 34% of their funding from government, hospices for children receive on average only 19% of their funding from government.
      Sarah Champion is rightly campaigning to get more equitable funding for the childrens hospices.
      The previous Labour government has had nothing to do with any of this. … and there are no hidden agendas – it is an historic anomaly – there are more elderly people who needed hospices, and kids, well they just suffered at home. ***
      You are however right when you say that one should not get involved with a charity until you have read its constitution (which include its charitable objectives) and studied its accounts. If you aren’t comfortable with any organisation – have nothing to do with it.
      ____________
      *** if you want to understand more, try here:
      http://www.helpthehospices.org.uk/about-hospice-care/facts-figures/

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  2. But Rothpol is right with his criticism of some charities, they can and are being used for purposes that Henry the Eight had never intended.
    A couple of days ago the House of Commons Public Affairs Committee branded the Charity Commissioners as “not fit for purpose” for not stomping on the abuse of the whole charity system.
    (“about bloody time”, was my reaction – but all praise to Madge Hodge MP (chair of the committee) for coming out and saying it.)
    http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/feb/05/mps-condemn-charities-watchdog

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    • Hi Regular reader.
      Henry the the VIII wasn’t the most noble of people, he didn’t like the church having as much power as himself, just imagine the dis service he did by trashing Roche Abbey. All these charities seem to have sprung up under the last Labour government of Tony Blair and Gordon Brown. Like the Tories sold of all our crown jewels, Labour did it with many of the social services the government used to run and put them into the private sector. Considering that these children in hospices haven’t had a fair chance in life, there is no way this shouldn’t be fully funded by the NHS. I got the Bluebell wood hospice to speak at the first business club meeting and the guy refused to bring up the poor funding for children’s hospice, I wonder why. How much was Sarah Champion receiving at the time as head of Bluebell Wood Hospice?
      I think the £280K David Milliband is earning working for a charity is absolutely disgusting and many charities are employing people earning these vast sums. Too many people and businesses are exploiting charities for their own ends, you really need to look at the small print and check where the money from these charities goes and if is spent where it really should be spent.
      I will be making a complaint to Tesco the next time I go in about the number of chuggers in their entrances. It takes 1.5 years before your contributions to a charity help, after giving to a chugger.
      I know many big organisations like to make the public aware how much they give to charities, but I think this is often more about good PR, otherwise they would give much more on the quiet, which is how charity should work not exploiting it for PR.
      Cheers Tim

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      • Hi Tim – just catching up.
        “All these charities seem to have sprung up under the last Labour government of Tony Blair and Gordon Brown.” Every charity I have ever had any involvement with was in existence long before that, but then, I have been alive much longer than you have.
        “I got the Bluebell wood hospice to speak at the first business club meeting and the guy refused to bring up the poor funding for children’s hospice, I wonder why.” Almost certainly that is because criticism of government policy is not a charitable objective, and they didn’t want to put their charitable status at risk. . See: http://www.charitycommission.gov.uk/Publications/cc9.aspx#13
        “How much was Sarah Champion receiving at the time as head of Bluebell Wood Hospice?” The accounts state that they had one person earning between £60,000 and £65,000 pa during her final two years with them.
        “I think the £280K David Milliband is earning working for a charity is absolutely disgusting ” He doesn’t work for a UK charity; he works for a US American “not-for-profit” as both its President and CEO. Where did you find his salary? I didn’t think it was published*, and in any case it is in USD not sterling. (It pays one employee of its UK relative slightly more than £100,000.) Both the Mail and Telegraph think he is on £300K. (* it will be visible in the IRS returns sometime this year).
        “… and many charities are employing people earning these vast sums.” No they are not.
        Most biased shock horror (ie Daily Mail style) reporting focuses on the CEO of Save the Children UK Justin Forsyth who is on £163,000). But for a fuller analysis this is a far better read: http://www.theguardian.com/society/2013/aug/06/foreign-aid-charities-defend-executive-salaries.
        ______________________
        Tim, I don’t think you have any real understanding of where the problems lie. It’s not with a few well paid CEOs , it is with the total abuse of the tax advantages of charitable status by private schools, fringe religious organisations and tax-avoidance scams such as the Cup Trust:
        Have you heard of a charity called Cup Trust?
        £46m – value of Gift Aid claims submitted by The Cup Trust to HMRC. These have not been paid
        £152,292 – value of donations The Cup Trust has made to charitable causes up to 31 March 2013
        £176m – value of payments to The Cup Trust in relation to the tax avoidance scheme
        Two years: the time the Charity Commission’s investigation of The Cup Trust took before the investigation was closed with regulatory advice to the Trustee.
        And what about the Plymouth Brethren who spent £2m on lobbying and legal fees to get charity status: http://www.civilsociety.co.uk/finance/blogs/content/16821/plymouth_brethren_this_church_is_too_broad .
        http://paulflynnmp.typepad.com/my_weblog/2014/02/spoiling-the-egyptians.html
        The CEO of the Charity Commission (a quango) earns in the range £134K to £139K
        ____________
        Bet you are pleased with the result of the Swiss Referendum (Masseneinwanderungsinitiative)! Even tho 49.7% of the Swiss aren’t!

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