A Trip Down Memory Lane

An email contributor saw this piece of history and thought of us:

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Our source has provided this on the purchase of Council Houses:

Right to Buy

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The Right to Buy scheme is a policy in the United Kingdom which gives secure tenants of councils and some housing associations the legal right to buy, at a large discount, the home they are living in. There is also a Right to Acquire for assured tenants of housing association homes built with public subsidy after 1997, at a smaller discount. About 1.5 million homes in the UK have been sold in this manner since 1980. Critics claim that this compounded a housing shortage for those of low income, initiated a national house price bubble, and what is commonly recognised as the displacement and social cleansing of traditional communities.[1] Supporters claim that the programme gave millions of households a tangible asset, secured their families finances and by releasing cash to repay Local Authority loans, and helped improve the public finances.[citation needed]

History[edit]

Council Housing

Council-type housing stock in Weaverham, now mostly owner-occupied

Individual local authorities have always had the ability to sell council houses to their tenants, but until the early 1970s such sales were extremely rare.

The Labour Party initially proposed the idea of the right of tenants to own the house they live in, in its manifesto for the 1959 General Election

21 thoughts on “A Trip Down Memory Lane

  1. On this side of the street there is a labour councillor, ex-mayor, who also bought his council house, and this when labour were in government, and even in the constituency of a labour minister ! The message appears to be clear, not even labour trusted labour to protect council housing, they did not practice what they preached, they held senior local political positions, and somehow had the invisible resources to purchase the council properties from their respective councils that decried the policy of selling council properties.

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  2. Correct me if I’m wrong, but if his wife says they bought the house ten tears ago, it must have been well before right to buy came in. I can remember the incident but not the actual dates. The article shown does not have a date on it, but I think it was early eighties. That raises more questions.

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  3. Why would anyone keep £15,000 in a wardrobe?

    “I think Jack intended to take it to the bank”.
    To paraphrase: She would say that wouldn’t she?

    Unlike today I doubt Her Majesty’s finest didn’t think to ask him to explain where the cash came from?
    Hmmm………………..

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    • . . . and sadly there are many of them still doing their worst today . . . also teaching the next generation to behave the same way . . .

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      • Yup, Just a question for my own personal information…. Are you saying that it is and was against RMBC Labour council to purchase council houses say from around 1980s onwards…

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        • With thanks and due respect for the provider of this information:
          Individual local authorities have always had the ability to sell council houses to their tenants, but until the early 1970s such sales were extremely rare.
          The Labour Party initially proposed the idea of the right of tenants to own the house they live in, in its manifesto for the 1959 General Election

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  4. Hmmmm…. Perhaps nobody wants to answer my question.
    Let me put it another way… Was it council policy in1989 for councilors to buy up council houses that became vacant….

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      • I don’t wonder there will be a few current and ex councilors cringing at the revelations coming out exposing their double mindedness…
        Johnny Cash nailed it with ” you can run on for a long time, run on for a long time, run on for a long time but sooner or later ” etc

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  5. Just popped by to say hello and saw this. I can tell you that Layden and Fred Jerram bought their Council Houses well before right to buy. I foundĺ it in old council minutes dating from the 70s while reseaching in the early 80s. Advertiser would not print it as it was scared of Layden mafia.

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  6. This is very interesting. For this side of the asphalt fence the question must now be asked: WHO gave permission for the Labour Cabinet Advisor for COUNCIL Housing to buy the council house – surely a conflict of interest demanding an immediate resignation ?

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