Banned Rotherham taxi drivers could still work in town, MPs warned

Taxi drivers banned from Rotherham in the wake of the child abuse scandal may still be able to work in the town, MPs have been warned.

Rotherham Council commissioner Mary Ney said that the introduction of tougher standards in the town has resulted in around 40 drivers losing their taxi licences.

But she said those turned down for licences in Rotherham may be able to get them from neighbouring local councils who do not have the same standards before returning to ply their trade in Rotherham.

Read on… http://www.thestar.co.uk/news/banned-rotherham-taxi-drivers-could-still-work-in-town-mps-warned-1-7996499

Scandal of Rotherham ‘grooming’ cabbies who can get their licences back just by crossing the border

Taxi drivers banned from Rotherham in the wake of the child abuse scandal may still be able to work in the town, MPs have been warned.

Rotherham Council commissioner Mary Ney said the introduction of tougher standards in the town has resulted in around 40 drivers losing their taxi licences.

Read on… http://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/news/crime/scandal-of-rotherham-grooming-cabbies-who-can-get-their-licences-back-just-by-crossing-the-border-1-7995975

9 thoughts on “Banned Rotherham taxi drivers could still work in town, MPs warned

  1. When did the law change its always been that you can only work in the town you was licensed for the car could be plated out of town but the driver had to have a license issued by the local authority they was working in

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    • Doesn’t apply if you work out of town, which is why these banned drivers are applying for licenses from other authorities. However, surely all councils are aware of this little trick and should be able to come up with solutions.

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  2. Is that the same as Labour councillors “being unfit for office”
    Then crawling back in on all fours, as “Donkeys with red blankets on”?

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  3. There is a simple answer (If Labour controlled councils can understand this)
    Q. “Why are you applying for a taxi licence outside your own town/city?”
    A. “Er, erm………………………………………”. ‘Next’.
    Plus a simple ‘phone call to RMBC (I stress simple. We don’t want to overload the poor darlings)

    How hard can it be?
    .

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    • Quite hard, it appears. [And, for the record, I’m in favour of strong regulation.]

      I’ve just had a look at the legislative background and the current context.

      There’s a helpful summary:
      Taxi and private hire vehicle licensing
      SN02005, 5 August 2015
      House of Commons Library
      http://www.researchbriefings.files.parliament.uk/documents/SN02005/SN02005.pdf

      The overall context is one where the government have been trying to ‘reduce the regulatory burden’ relating to taxis and private hire vehicles (PHV).

      As the briefing confirms: “Crucially, licensing officers are unable to undertake enforcement against vehicles, drivers and operators licensed in another area.”

      The Law Commission in May 2012, under pressure from the government, proposed – amongst other things –
      • freeing up cross-border working for PHVs so that operators would no longer be limited to using drivers and vehicles from their own licensing area or restricted to only inviting or accepting bookings within that licensing area;
      • common national standards for vehicles, drivers and dispatchers
      • a single consolidated legislative framework with reduced regulation.

      In May 2014, the government proposed:
      • to allow a PHV operator to sub-contract a PHV booking to another operator who is licensed in a different licensing district
      • to allow people who do not hold a PHV driver’s licence to drive a licensed PHV when the vehicle was not being used as a PHV (for example, a licensed PHV driver’s partner could use the vehicle for a family outing).

      The Conservative Minister at the time, Stephen Hammond, explained that the changes would
      “… have a huge impact on the ability of operators to meet passenger needs and to grow their businesses, and it should help to make the passenger’s experience much more convenient. In short, it is a liberating measure. It will allow the private hire trade to operate in the way that it sees fit, not just in the way that the current legislation dictates………..”

      As was pointed out in debate, this would be in a context where “licensing officers have no power to stop moving vehicles, to prevent drivers from driving off or even to request a driver to reveal their identity.” The Liberal Democrat Minister in the House of Lords only backed down under a lot of opposition.

      Perhaps there could be some unity in pressing for
      • high common national standards for vehicles, drivers, operators and dispatchers
      • tough common enforcement standards, wherever the licensing took place.

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  4. This ridiculous situation puts our most vulnerable at considerable risk.
    The ‘criminal fraternity’ amongst the taxi companies and their drivers, do not want to comply with our rules, because it would stop their criminal activity!

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    • That comment sounds really impressive but so what? It’s obvious that the only “contribution ” our Pakistani community makes is the taxi “service” and that’s because it’s ready cash and a nice front for various criminal endeavours. BUT nothing will change to alter that while we have yellow belly, self serving politicians.

      Like

  5. Pingback: Last weeks top ten 9th July | Rotherham Politics

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