Scandal of foreign students who’ve SCARPERED owing Britain £1.2 BILLION in student loans

ALMOST 80,000 foreign students have scarpered abroad leaving the British tax payer facing a £1.2 BILLION bill in unpaid student loans.

The Student Loans Company (SLC), which is charged with tracking down former university students who haven’t paid off their loans, has admitted that 78,700 former students who owe money have now left the UK, which means it has to reach across the globe in an attempt to claw back the unpaid debts.

These students, who between them owe the Government an average of £15,000 each, are scattered all over the globe with outstanding accounts registered as far away as Malawi, Pakistan, Uganda, Iraq and Argentina.

Read on… http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/820072/Scandal-foreign-EU-students-owe-Britain-1-2-BILLION-student-loans-university

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11 Responses to Scandal of foreign students who’ve SCARPERED owing Britain £1.2 BILLION in student loans

  1. reg reader says:

    This Express article makes little sense to me.

    The “Almost 80,000” is in fact 78,700 students of whom:
    17,600 are in arrears with repayments
    12,100 have failed to state their earnings, and thus assumed to be in arrears
    and …
    49,000 who have yet to be earning enough to start repayment. I wouldn’t use the words “scandal” or “scarpered” in their case.

    …and of the 78,700, 21,800 are students from other EU countries who presumably returned to their own country after graduation. I wouldn’t use the words “scandal” or “scarpered” in their case either, and my understanding is that they can only get a loan for their tuition fees.

    Now the Express starts off by saying “ALMOST 80,000 foreign students”, … and we learn that 21,800 are from the other EU countries, so where do the other 56,900 come from?
    Well some may be in these groups:
    – the child of a Swiss national
    – the child of a Turkish worker
    – a European Economic Area (EEA) or Swiss migrant worker, or family member of one
    – a refugee, or family member of one
    – an asylum seeker who has humanitarian protection (as a result of a failed application for asylum).**

    … but I rather imagine the majority are simply British who have gone to live abroad, hardly “foreign”.

    Can anyone think of another explanation?
    RR

    ** https://www.nus.org.uk/en/advice/money-and-funding/im-an-international-student-and-i-want-to-study-in-the-uk–what-higher-education-funding-can-i-get/

  2. Ginger Nut says:

    Simples –

    £1.2 billion could pay for tuition fees for our own students considering that in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland (all bebefactors of the Bartlett funding formula).where students do not pay tuition fees.

    This was Blair’s pandering to the lefty Vice Chancellors who are desperate to recruit overseas students as they contribute through high fees.to Higher Education coffers. They are given loans as an incentive to come and can access student loans.

    It is evident that enforcing repayment from those domiciled abroad is virtually impossible. Ask any overseas student.

    • reg reader says:

      …and what has any of what you say justify that dubious Daily Express article. ?

    • reg reader says:

      “Vice Chancellors who are desperate to recruit overseas students as they contribute through high fees.to Higher Education coffers. They are given loans as an incentive to come and can access student loans.”

      It is certainly true that non-EU students pay higher fees, but it is not true that they get loans from the Student Loans Authority.

      • Colin Tawn says:

        @rr.
        I’m somewhat confused by your post.

        You wrote ‘it is not true that they get loans from the Student Loans Authority.’
        In the preceding paragraph you wrote ‘ …can access student loans.”

        Logic would seem to dictate that access to student loans means loans are granted.
        If students have access to a loan facility would they not use it?

        • reg reader says:

          Colin, in that preceding paragraph I was simply quoting what Gingernut had written, before correcting his misinformation in the final paragraph.

    • reg reader says:

      “It is evident that enforcing repayment from those domiciled abroad is virtually impossible. Ask any overseas student.”
      Almost all of the people on my son’s MSc course at LSE were from outside UK. I doubt if any of them didn’t cover their costs themselves. Even my son didn’t have SLA funding for it.

  3. Ginger Nut says:

    Student loans are not exclusive for paying tution fees but can be used however the student decides. How Student Loans are spent is not monitored in any way.

  4. Colin Tawn says:

    There is a solution to collecting unpaid tuition fees-if those responsible have got the cajones to do it.
    I’ll try and put it in context:If a student does not pay the parking charge levied on student parking his/her degree can be witheld.
    Apply the same rules to loans and voila! No pay, no degree.
    Simples.

    • reg reader says:

      Colin,
      The Students Loan people can only ever learn about non-payment long after the student has graduated and collected their degree.
      This is how it works for students still resident in UK who were living in England when they took out the loan:
      http://media.slc.co.uk/repayment/qsg/how-do-i-repay.html

      It gets far more complicated when the student comes from and returns to one of the other EU countries.
      But look, the Express runs a variation on this story most years (the “Related Articles” list the more recent ones), just as annually it runs one on “foreigners” getting free NHS treatment.
      …and just a few days earlier, working from the same SLC data it came up with “SNP student loan SHAME: Pupils facing SOARING debts under Sturgeon’s tuition policy”
      http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/817658/Scotland-Student-debt-loan-tuition-fees-SNP
      – they hate the SNP almost as much as they hate foreigners. … and the story appears as nonsensical and innumerate at the one featured above.
      There are real problems with the current student loans system, this article covers many of them:
      “Rising inflation pushes student loans interest to 6.1 per cent”
      https://www.ft.com/content/19c436f0-57e7-11e7-9fed-c19e2700005f

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